Enjoying, sharing and remembering…

Watching this 62 Impala going over the ramp brought back memories.

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When Roger was around 13 years old, he remembers his brother Jim coming to get him in a 62 impala that belonged to his other brother Roly. Driving to the family gathering, he also remembers hearing the song: I’m falling in love with you by Elvis Presley for the first time and truly enjoying it. He was already in love… with music and cars 😊

And that is what the blog is all about…enjoying, sharing and remembering!

But, for those wondering, Roger will have two more cars in his showroom 🙂

One of two 1957 Studebaker Copper Hawk and…

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this beautiful 1941 Dodge pickup.

As for Reno, we will remember the people, the sun, the landscape… and the cars.

 

Unfortunately, we did not have time to visit Lake Tahoe. I guess that indicates we might be back 😊

But first, let’s find out what is next on Roger’s bucket list…

 

Hot August Nights

The parade of champions downtown Reno is the highlight for many.

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Entertainment is free at every parking lot and celebrations go on well into the night…

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But for us, tomorrow is another day…

 

Third and final call…sold sold sold!

OOps…Third and final parking lot… seen, seen, seen! The last we visit anyway…

After watching the auction for 2 days, you begin to hear the auctioneers in your sleep, ha! The monstrous Perpermill hotel and casino is a short walk away from the Convention Centre.

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Can you spot the roadrunner in the Roadrunner?

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Need that water bag.  You are in the desert!

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All these vehicles are Born Again

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Do not know if the Forty 7, the Fine 54 or the 55 HUD would like to mess with the Crazy 59 or the Bad 65 lol

Another auction day left.  Roger is seriously looking at a few cars. To follow…

 

But none of these cars are for sale…

Luckily for Roger, MAG Auctions just happen to be in town this weekend 😊

IMG_6674 (1) The Convention Centre is full of classics.


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I really hope I will not end up driving one of these…

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These Creative Characters never miss an auction lol

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Very interesting. Documented but owner believes it might or might not be…


IMG_6687 (1)Maybe someone else should be wearing this shirt…

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This gentleman did buy the 68 Buick.  Is he a man of his word? We shall never know 🙂

No hot rods here…

When in Reno, visiting the National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection) is a must. It displays automobiles from the 19th century to and throughout the 20th century. Mr Harrah went to great lengths to restore his very unique vehicles to their original state.

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This 1892 Philion with a 2 cylinder steam engine was the only one produced. For those of us who remember Red Skeleton, he starred in the 1951 movie Excuse my dust in which this car appeared.

1892 PHILION

In 1901, De Dion Bouton Moterette Co. sold for 1 500$.

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What do you think this 1910 Limited Touring Seven Passenger Oldsmobile sold for originally?

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It sold for 4 600$, the equivalent of 120 000$ today.

 

This 1921 Ford innovation predated the RV craze 😊

1921 Ford-an innovation that predated the RV craze

Although this 1937 Airomobile was an engineering success and could drive up to 80 mph, it failed to attract financial backing. This was the only one built.

Have you ever heard of the Thomas Flyer? It won the 1908 22 000 mile race between New York and Paris. At times it had to be pulled by horses through mud or snow, but it did win the race. With the help of 40 crafstmen and restoration experts, the vehicle was restored as it was when it finished the race.

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The museum also boasts a collection of gas pumps. Initially, the gasoline was sold by general stores and stored in barrels. Can you imagine handling gasoline in an enclosed shop with a wood stove providing winter heat?

By 1920, the first visible pumps were introduced. They were replaced by clock meter pumps in the 1930’s.

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